“Oysters more important than just a half-shell delight”

Ray Grizzle, a research professor at the University of New Hampshire installs equipment on an oyster reef in San Carlos Bay that will help determine how much water per square meter per day an oyster reef filters. On the left is Sanibel Captiva Conservation Foundation marine lab director, Eric Milbrandt. (Andrew West/The News-Press, Andrew West/The News-Press)

Ray Grizzle, a research professor at the University of New Hampshire installs equipment on an oyster reef in San Carlos Bay that will help determine how much water per square meter per day an oyster reef filters. On the left is Sanibel Captiva Conservation Foundation marine lab director, Eric Milbrandt. (Andrew West/The News-Press, Andrew West/The News-Press)

“‘Historically, oysters were mainly known for their food value,’ Grizzle said. ‘Now, we’re looking at them in terms of ecosystem services: What they do for the ecosystem that we as humans value.

‘They have many services: They’re habitat for things like fish and crabs; they’re food for many species; they stabilize sediments. That all sounds like seagrass. But oysters also filter water, and we’re quantifying that water filtration.'”

Read the full News-Press story here.